PB Interviews: Clockingout by Eunice An

Photo by @clockingout_

Photo by @clockingout_

Meet Eunice An of Clockingout, an artist based in Seoul whose art is just as magical and piquant as her humor. Our Get Weird T-shirt was inspired by the peculiar rabbit mascot of Clockingout--go behind the scenes to get to know who Eunice is, and her unnerving obsession with Pennywise the Clown from the 2017 thriller hit "IT". 

Photo by @clockingout_

Photo by @clockingout_

Who are you, and what do you do in your spare time? My name is Eunice. The older I get, the more I connect with Shrek. He must be my spirit animal, and everyone better get off my swamp. At times, I feel on top of things and am very pleased. But today is not that day. In my spare time, I play with my dog, daydream about having more dogs, remind myself to work out, search weird movies to watch, sing on my keyboard, and draw.

When did you first start drawing? I must've started as a toddler, like most of us. Then, I started again in middle school, but not for the sake of drawing; I just wanted to be like my sister who was an art student at the time. It wasn't until last summer (of '16) that I opened the sketchbook for myself.

Photo by @clockingout_

Photo by @clockingout_

Have your creative curiosities changed since you first started drawing? If yes, how so? Yes. Initially, I thought that being creative meant your product had to be perfect, whether it be a story, a drawing, or a song, and that by being perfect, people will like your stuff. This also meant that I wasn't good enough, which discouraged me from creating anything. Since I started drawing last summer, I came across many roadblocks. I couldn't draw a symmetrical face, I had never used Illustrator or Photoshop before, and the questions loomed: "will I ever be as good as the old masters?" and "will people like my stuff?" I made a Facebook business page, an Instagram account, and an online shop for my products. Then, more roadblocks showed up. I didn't know how to gain SNS followers, I didn't understand the analytics, and I didn't have a customer base. The whole thing kind of just flopped. I was too eager to arrive at a destination, just as before. I went through a slump and stopped drawing entirely for about a month. Drawing, creating anything, should only be as toilsome as the process itself, but realizing that drawing became stressful for other reasons put things into perspective. Now, I'm more focused on the creativity, more curious about what it is that's making me pick up my pen and pencil, why I'm choosing certain color schemes, and what the subjects in my drawings are feeling. Now, I'm interested in what I create, and each time I draw is like a bonding experience, much like with authors and their characters. I wonder if it's like this for others as well. I got rid of my online shop since, and I draw and share my work with pure intentions.

Photo by @clockingout_

Photo by @clockingout_

Can you name some non-artistic influences? The primary influence is the most un-artistic thing of all (anti-artistic, even): my corporate life. Here is where my product most definitely should be perfect and every decision be systematic, data-driven, and left-brained. This is also where I got the name "Clockingout" because all my creative efforts take place after work hours. Other than my desk job that pays the bills, I get the inspiration for each piece from my relationships, dreams, and own angst toward something usually temporary and personal.

What's something people are surprised to find out about you? I think it depends on the setting, but here in Seoul, people are surprised to find out that I'm American.

Photo by @clockingout_

Photo by @clockingout_

If you can pick your favorite drawing out of all the ones you drew, which one would it be? Why, at the moment, it would have to be Pennywise, the Dancing Clown! I became intensely obsessed with the new movie. I can quote most of Pennywise's lines, but I will refrain. My all-time favorite, however, is Aldo Over Flowers. It took about 30 minutes by hand and an additional 30 minutes in Photoshop. Everything flowed so naturally, and it came out exactly as I was thinking it in my head, almost like a perfectly coordinated teamwork between my hand and my head, which rarely happens. Every time I look at it, I feel comfortable, and there's nothing I would add or take away. I daresay, to me, it is perfect, although that wasn't my intention with it or any of my drawings now.

Photo by @clockingout_

Photo by @clockingout_

Name some of your favorite artists and/or musicians. Sam Smith, Adele, Arctic Monkeys, Zion T, Soey Milk, Mr. Misang, Rhee Haedo, and James Jean. They make me make involuntary facial expressions and sounds. 

Lastly, what would you like your audience to experience when they see your art? I want them to have fun looking at it, to decide it playful, sarcastic, or exasperated, even. I want them to be curious and ask questions like: "what's gotten into this one?" My art is like Tinker Bell to me -attached, mischievous, and a bit angry, and I'd like others to see that too.